Kin 2015-16

Kin 2015-16

DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD
DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD
DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD
DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD
DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD
DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD
DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD
DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD
DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD
DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD
DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD
DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD
DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD
DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD
DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD
DAVISTHOMAS - KIN, SUNSHINE COAST HOSPITAL, QLD

making Kin's mould 

QUT students and davisthomas team moulding Kin 

Kin - Torin and Jaia pulling plugs our of the Kin Mould 

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KIN is inspired by the idea of creating a space for contemplation. Developing a place of interstice and respite for both visitors and patients alike, the concept evolved from our research into contemplative environments, acts, and objects. These investigations flowed into ideas of ritual, time and cycles, and the deeply rooted tradition of connectivity and kinship created through shared experiences. Be these experiences in sites of solitude and quiet meditation, or engagement with others through activity and communication.

 

The native flora of the area also inspired the concept. The richness of texture, structure, colour and form of the local ancient native habitat informed the visual form and textures of the artwork. In particular, the Banksia and its cycle from seedpod to flower to pod underpinned the visual language of the sculptural elements. Banksias combine a lightness and ephemerality within their flowers with that of a woody textured solidity in the form of the seedpods. They transition from one form to the other in a cycle that echoes in time immemorial; connecting to both the annual cycle of seasons and the geographic timescale of the sunshine coast’s landscape. Our artwork concept emerged from a complexity of interrelated concepts, visual elements, and materials.

 

The lighting design of this work is a subtle change of lighting colour, programmed to a cycle at a nearly imperceivable pace of change. Approximately 15 minutes per colour shift.